Paulist Press

Celebrating the Intersection of Faith and Culture

6 notes

"At the cross her station keeping,Stood the mournful mother weeping,Close to Jesus to the last.Through her heart, his sorrow sharing,All his bitter anguish bearing,Now at length the sword has passed.”
For a while there were two feasts in honor of the Sorrowful Mother: one going back to the 15th century, the other to the 17th century. For a while both were celebrated by the universal Church: one on the Friday before Palm Sunday, the other in September.
The principal biblical references to Mary’s sorrows are in Luke 2:35 and John 19:26-27. The Lucan passage is Simeon’s prediction about a sword piercing Mary’s soul; the Johannine passage relates Jesus’ words to Mary and to the beloved disciple.
Many early Church writers interpret the sword as Mary’s sorrows, especially as she saw Jesus die on the cross. Thus, the two passages are brought together as prediction and fulfillment.
St. Ambrose (December7) in particular sees Mary as a sorrowful yet powerful figure at the cross. Mary stood fearlessly at the cross while others fled. Mary looked on her Son’s wounds with pity, but saw in them the salvation of the world. As Jesus hung on the cross, Mary did not fear to be killed but offered herself to her persecutors.


"At the cross her station keeping,
Stood the mournful mother weeping,
Close to Jesus to the last.
Through her heart, his sorrow sharing,
All his bitter anguish bearing,
Now at length the sword has passed.”

For a while there were two feasts in honor of the Sorrowful Mother: one going back to the 15th century, the other to the 17th century. For a while both were celebrated by the universal Church: one on the Friday before Palm Sunday, the other in September.

The principal biblical references to Mary’s sorrows are in Luke 2:35 and John 19:26-27. The Lucan passage is Simeon’s prediction about a sword piercing Mary’s soul; the Johannine passage relates Jesus’ words to Mary and to the beloved disciple.

Many early Church writers interpret the sword as Mary’s sorrows, especially as she saw Jesus die on the cross. Thus, the two passages are brought together as prediction and fulfillment.

St. Ambrose (December7) in particular sees Mary as a sorrowful yet powerful figure at the cross. Mary stood fearlessly at the cross while others fled. Mary looked on her Son’s wounds with pity, but saw in them the salvation of the world. As Jesus hung on the cross, Mary did not fear to be killed but offered herself to her persecutors.

Filed under Our Lady of Sorrows Saint of the Day Mother Mary

17 notes

You are the rock on which this nation was founded. You alone are the true source of our cherished rights to life,liberty and the pursuit of happiness… Send Your Spirit to touch the hearts of our nation’s leaders. Open their minds to the great worth of human life and the responsibilities that accompany human freedom. Remind Your people that true happiness is rooted in seeking and doing Your will. Through the intercession of Mary Immaculate, Patroness of our land,grant us the courage to reject the  “culture of death.” Lead us into a new millennium of life. We ask this through Christ Our Lord.

You are the rock on which this nation was founded.
You alone are the true source of our cherished rights to
life,liberty and the pursuit of happiness…

Send Your Spirit to touch the hearts of our nation’s leaders.
Open their minds to the great worth of human life
and the responsibilities that accompany human freedom.
Remind Your people that true happiness is rooted in
seeking and doing Your will.

Through the intercession of Mary Immaculate,
Patroness of our land,grant us the courage to reject the
“culture of death.”
Lead us into a new millennium of life.
We ask this through Christ Our Lord.

267 notes

life-gift-love-eternal:

allthingscatholic:

The name “ladybird" originated in the Middle Ages when the insects were known as the "beetle of Our Lady”. They were named after the Virgin Mary, who in early religious paintings was often shown wearing a red cloak. The spots of the seven spot ladybird were said to symbolise seven joys and seven sorrows. Common names in other European languages have the same association (the German name Marienkäfer translates to “Marybeetle" or ladybeetle). In the USA the name was Americanized to "ladybug".—Ladybird: Etymology
The Seven Sorrows1. The Prophecy of Simeon to Mary over the Infant Jesus (Luke 2:34)”Thy own soul a sword shall pierce.”2. The Flight into Egypt of the Holy Family (Matthew 2:13)3. The Loss of the Child Jesus for Three Days (Luke 2:43)4. The Meeting of Jesus and Mary along the Way of the Cross (Luke 23:26)5. The Crucifixion, where Mary stands at the foot of the cross (John 19:25)6. The Descent from the Cross, where Mary receives the dead body of Jesus in her arms (Matthew 27:57)7. The Burial of Jesus (John 19:40)—Our Lady of Sorrows
The Seven Joys1. The Annunciation2. The Nativity of Jesus3. The Adoration of the Magi4. The Resurrection of Christ5. The Ascension of Christ to Heaven6. The Pentecost or Descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles and Mary7. The Coronation of the Virgin in Heaven
In the olden days, British farmers prayed to the Virgin Mary for help with their crops. Then ladybugs arrived and helped the farmers by eating crop-eating bugs and saved farmers’ crops. In honour of these bugs, the farmers called the beetles “Our Lady’s beetle,” which turned into ladybug. —Going Bug-gy! Facts and Fun About Insects

And this I never knew

life-gift-love-eternal:

allthingscatholic:

The name “ladybird" originated in the Middle Ages when the insects were known as the "beetle of Our Lady”. They were named after the Virgin Mary, who in early religious paintings was often shown wearing a red cloak. The spots of the seven spot ladybird were said to symbolise seven joys and seven sorrows. Common names in other European languages have the same association (the German name Marienkäfer translates to “Marybeetle" or ladybeetle). In the USA the name was Americanized to "ladybug".
Ladybird: Etymology


The Seven Sorrows
1. The Prophecy of Simeon to Mary over the Infant Jesus (Luke 2:34)
Thy own soul a sword shall pierce.
2. The Flight into Egypt of the Holy Family (Matthew 2:13)
3. The Loss of the Child Jesus for Three Days (Luke 2:43)
4. The Meeting of Jesus and Mary along the Way of the Cross (Luke 23:26)
5. The Crucifixion, where Mary stands at the foot of the cross (John 19:25)
6. The Descent from the Cross, where Mary receives the dead body of Jesus in her arms (Matthew 27:57)
7. The Burial of Jesus (John 19:40)
Our Lady of Sorrows


The Seven Joys
1. The Annunciation
2. The Nativity of Jesus
3. The Adoration of the Magi
4. The Resurrection of Christ
5. The Ascension of Christ to Heaven
6. The Pentecost or Descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles and Mary
7. The Coronation of the Virgin in Heaven


In the olden days, British farmers prayed to the Virgin Mary for help with their crops. Then ladybugs arrived and helped the farmers by eating crop-eating bugs and saved farmers’ crops. In honour of these bugs, the farmers called the beetles “Our Lady’s beetle,” which turned into ladybug. 
Going Bug-gy! Facts and Fun About Insects

And this I never knew

(via nonelesstherestless)

Filed under the nativity of mary catholic holidays today i learned catholicism mother mary catholic

1 note

Faithful Aspirations

Paulist Press author, Fr. Frank DeSiano has an article published America Magazine!

To celebrate his most recent article, we will feature his writings from the Press across our social media platforms.

Filed under America Magazine paulist press Paulist Fathers

0 notes

Meeting the Living God - William J O'Malley : PaulistPress

Paulist Press celebrates Back to School in a more holy way.

Tackle the “God problem” in terms that high school students can understand in their language and from the perspective of their culture. Witty, provocative and thoughtful, this book has been extremely successful as well in adult ed/parish education programs.

Filed under back to school meeting the living god spirituality teenage years

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What Are They Saying About Augustine? - Joseph T. Kelley : PaulistPress

Filed under augustine of hippo saint of the day what are they saying about augustine? paulist press

4 notes

Pope lifts ban on 'left-wing' bishop

"… Francis’s decision to send the case of the Archbishop Romero to the Vatican’s saint-making office flies in the face of what his two predecessors advocated. Indeed, Francis’s own instincts early on in his Church career also tended to be suspicious of Romero’s Liberation Theology, preferring clerics to steer away from political analysis and advocate salvation through prayer instead.

Yet many Catholics have been puzzled as to why a man killed for standing up for the Poor, has for so long been ignored by a Church which claims to speak for them. The Pope’s comments don’t mean he’s changed his mind on Liberation Theology but may be an acknowledgment that, for many Catholics, Oscar Romero is already a saint - in practice, if not in name…”

Filed under Archbishop Oscar Romero beatification bbc news - home catholic news Catholic History

116 notes

Let us not tire of preaching love;  it is the force that will overcome the world.  Let us not tire of preaching love.  Though we see that waves of violence succeed in drowning the fire of Christian love,  love must win out; it is the only thing that can,  We have never preached violence, except the violence of love,  which left Christ nailed to a cross,  the violence that we must each do to ourselves  to overcome our selfishness and such cruel inequalities among us.  The violence we preach is not the violence of the sword,  the violence of hatred.  It is the violence of love,  of brotherhood,  the violence that wills to beat weapons  into sickles for work.” Archbishop Oscar Romero
Let us not tire of preaching love;
it is the force that will overcome the world.
Let us not tire of preaching love.
Though we see that waves of violence
succeed in drowning the fire of Christian love,
love must win out; it is the only thing that can,

We have never preached violence,
except the violence of love,
which left Christ nailed to a cross,
the violence that we must each do to ourselves
to overcome our selfishness
and such cruel inequalities among us.
The violence we preach is not the violence of the sword,
the violence of hatred.
It is the violence of love,
of brotherhood,
the violence that wills to beat weapons
into sickles for work.”

Archbishop Oscar Romero

Filed under Oscar Romero Response to violence

1 note

“Courage, my sons. Don’t you see that we are leaving on a mission? They pay our fare in the bargain. What a piece of good luck! The thing to do now is to pray well in order to win as many souls as possible. Let us, then, tell the Blessed Virgin that we are content, and that she can do with us anything she wishes”  ~ Maximilian Kolbe Learn more about the Saint of Auschwitz on his feast day.

“Courage, my sons. Don’t you see that we are leaving on a mission? They pay our fare in the bargain. What a piece of good luck! The thing to do now is to pray well in order to win as many souls as possible. Let us, then, tell the Blessed Virgin that we are content, and that she can do with us anything she wishes”
~ Maximilian Kolbe

Learn more about the Saint of Auschwitz on his feast day.

Filed under maximilian kolbe Saint of Auschwitz