Paulist Press

Celebrating the Intersection of Faith and Culture

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Mary of Magdala was so prominent in the early church that it was impossible to omit her name from the texts and equally impossible to change the form of the identifying phrase by which she was known. The frequency and consistency with which this form is used signifies widespread and accepted usage. The prominence of the form also indicates that the best narratives of crucifixion, burial  and resurrection  contained a personal name, in a specific formulation, which could neither be minimalized nor omitted. Mary of Magdala was indeed a leader and apostle in the early church. No other position is ascribed to her
Mary Magdalene has been a victim of mistaken identity for almost twenty centuries. Yet she would no doubt insist that it makes no difference. We are all sinners in need of the saving power of God, whether our sins have been lurid or not. More importantly, we are all, with her, “unofficial” witnesses of the Resurrection. Learn more about the patron saint of penitents with Paulist Press. 
 http://ow.ly/zsEAm

Mary of Magdala was so prominent in the early church that it was impossible to omit her name from the texts and equally impossible to change the form of the identifying phrase by which she was known. The frequency and consistency with which this form is used signifies widespread and accepted usage. The prominence of the form also indicates that the best narratives of crucifixion, burial  and resurrection  contained a personal name, in a specific formulation, which could neither be minimalized nor omitted. Mary of Magdala was indeed a leader and apostle in the early church. No other position is ascribed to her

Mary Magdalene has been a victim of mistaken identity for almost twenty centuries. Yet she would no doubt insist that it makes no difference. We are all sinners in need of the saving power of God, whether our sins have been lurid or not. More importantly, we are all, with her, “unofficial” witnesses of the Resurrection. Learn more about the patron saint of penitents with Paulist Press. 


http://ow.ly/zsEAm

Filed under mary magdalene mary of magdala saint of the day catholic history catholicism

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"In beautiful things St. Francis saw Beauty itself, and through His vestiges imprinted on creation he followed his Beloved everywhere, making from all things a ladder by which he could climb up and embrace Him who is utterly desirable. If you desire to know … ask grace, not instruction; desire, not understanding; the groaning of prayer, not diligent reading; the Spouse, not the teacher; God, not man; darkness not clarity; not light, but fire that totally inflames and carries us into God by ecstatic unctions and burning affections.”
Saint Bonaventure. http://ow.ly/zbkuf

"In beautiful things St. Francis saw Beauty itself, and through His vestiges imprinted on creation he followed his Beloved everywhere, making from all things a ladder by which he could climb up and embrace Him who is utterly desirable. If you desire to know … ask grace, not instruction; desire, not understanding; the groaning of prayer, not diligent reading; the Spouse, not the teacher; God, not man; darkness not clarity; not light, but fire that totally inflames and carries us into God by ecstatic unctions and burning affections.”

Saint Bonaventure.
http://ow.ly/zbkuf

Filed under Feast Day saint bonaventure saint of the day doctor of the church st francis beauty the prince of mystics

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#PopeJohnXXIII was naturally inclined toward unity. He was a master bridge builder… He received the Archbishop of Canterbury and head of the Anglican Church, Dr. Geoffrey Fisher, in December 1960. Such a meeting between the Pope and the Archbishop of Canterbury had not taken place for four hundred years.The prospective visit met with such disapproval that it was hidden from the media. 
(Cardinal) Bea recognized that the visit “has aroused a great deal of attention in the Press. He echoed Pope John’s statement that “it has been an occasion not only of great interest but also of many fanciful stories.” It is difficult to imagine today - with the multitude of images we have of Paul VI, John Paul II, Benedict XVI and Francis meeting with other Christian leaders and representatives of the world’s non-Christian religions - that this sort of occasion was so controversial.

An excerpt from The Vision of Saint John XXIII , Randall S. Rosenberg

Available at Paulist Press. ow.ly/Z90zm

#PopeJohnXXIII was naturally inclined toward unity. He was a master bridge builder… He received the Archbishop of Canterbury and head of the Anglican Church, Dr. Geoffrey Fisher, in December 1960. Such a meeting between the Pope and the Archbishop of Canterbury had not taken place for four hundred years.The prospective visit met with such disapproval that it was hidden from the media. 
(Cardinal) Bea recognized that the visit “has aroused a great deal of attention in the Press. He echoed Pope John’s statement that “it has been an occasion not only of great interest but also of many fanciful stories.” It is difficult to imagine today - with the multitude of images we have of Paul VI, John Paul II, Benedict XVI and Francis meeting with other Christian leaders and representatives of the world’s non-Christian religions - that this sort of occasion was so controversial.

An excerpt from The Vision of Saint John XXIII , Randall S. Rosenberg

Available at Paulist Press. ow.ly/Z90zm

Filed under popejohnxxiii

127 notes

“I am not my own; I have given myself to Jesus. He must be my only love. The state of helpless poverty that may befall me if I do not marry does not frighten me. All I need is a little food and a few pieces of clothing. With the work of my hands I shall always earn what is necessary and what is left over I’ll give to my relatives and to the poor. If I should become sick and unable to work, then I shall be like the Lord on the cross. He will have mercy on me and help me, I am sure.”
Saint Kateri Tekakwitha
Learn more about the holy men and women the Paulist Father’s hold dear with All Holy Men and Women. Available at Paulist Press http://ow.ly/z83ug

“I am not my own; I have given myself to Jesus. He must be my only love. The state of helpless poverty that may befall me if I do not marry does not frighten me. All I need is a little food and a few pieces of clothing. With the work of my hands I shall always earn what is necessary and what is left over I’ll give to my relatives and to the poor. If I should become sick and unable to work, then I shall be like the Lord on the cross. He will have mercy on me and help me, I am sure.”

Saint Kateri Tekakwitha

Learn more about the holy men and women the Paulist Father’s hold dear with All Holy Men and Women. Available at Paulist Press
http://ow.ly/z83ug

Filed under American Saint saint kateri tekawitha saint of the day catholic saints catholic history american history

8 notes


"All men are created equal: that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among them are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness; that to secure there rights governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed…"
Paulist Press wishes everyone a Happy Independence Day and thanks those who continue to protect our freedoms.

"All men are created equal: that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among them are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness; that to secure there rights governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed…"

Paulist Press wishes everyone a Happy Independence Day and thanks those who continue to protect our freedoms.

Filed under Indepenence Day fourth of july Paulist Press

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St. Kateri Tekakwitha(1656-1680)
The blood of martyrs is the seed of saints. Nine years after the Jesuits Isaac Jogues and John de Brébeuf (October 19) were tomahawked by Iroquois warriors, a baby girl was born near the place of their martyrdom, Auriesville, New York
Her mother was a Christian Algonquin, taken captive by the Iroquois and given as wife to the chief of the Mohawk clan, the boldest and fiercest of the Five Nations. When she was four, Kateri lost her parents and little brother in a smallpox epidemic that left her disfigured and half blind. She was adopted by an uncle, who succeeded her father as chief. He hated the coming of the Blackrobes (Jesuit missionaries), but could do nothing to them because a peace treaty with the French required their presence in villages with Christian captives. She was moved by the words of three Blackrobes who lodged with her uncle, but fear of him kept her from seeking instruction. She refused to marry a Mohawk brave and at 19 finally got the courage to take the step of converting. She was baptized with the name Kateri (Catherine) on Easter Sunday.
Now she would be treated as a slave. Because she would not work on Sunday, she received no food that day. Her life in grace grew rapidly. She told a missionary that she often meditated on the great dignity of being baptized. She was powerfully moved by God’s love for human beings and saw the dignity of each of her people.
She was always in danger, for her conversion and holy life created great opposition. On the advice of a priest, she stole away one night and began a 200-mile walking journey to a Christian Indian village at Sault St. Louis, near Montreal.
For three years she grew in holiness under the direction of a priest and an older Iroquois woman, giving herself totally to God in long hours of prayer, in charity and in strenuous penance. At 23 she took a vow of virginity, an unprecedented act for an Indian woman, whose future depended on being married. She found a place in the woods where she could pray an hour a day—and was accused of meeting a man there!
Her dedication to virginity was instinctive: She did not know about religious life for women until she visited Montreal. Inspired by this, she and two friends wanted to start a community, but the local priest dissuaded her. She humbly accepted an “ordinary” life. She practiced extremely severe fasting as penance for the conversion of her nation. She died the afternoon before Holy Thursday. Witnesses said that her emaciated face changed color and became like that of a healthy child. The lines of suffering, even the pockmarks, disappeared and the touch of a smile came upon her lips. She was beatified in 1980 and canonized in 2012..

St. Kateri Tekakwitha
(1656-1680)

Her mother was a Christian Algonquin, taken captive by the Iroquois and given as wife to the chief of the Mohawk clan, the boldest and fiercest of the Five Nations. When she was four, Kateri lost her parents and little brother in a smallpox epidemic that left her disfigured and half blind. She was adopted by an uncle, who succeeded her father as chief. He hated the coming of the Blackrobes (Jesuit missionaries), but could do nothing to them because a peace treaty with the French required their presence in villages with Christian captives. She was moved by the words of three Blackrobes who lodged with her uncle, but fear of him kept her from seeking instruction. She refused to marry a Mohawk brave and at 19 finally got the courage to take the step of converting. She was baptized with the name Kateri (Catherine) on Easter Sunday.

Now she would be treated as a slave. Because she would not work on Sunday, she received no food that day. Her life in grace grew rapidly. She told a missionary that she often meditated on the great dignity of being baptized. She was powerfully moved by God’s love for human beings and saw the dignity of each of her people.

She was always in danger, for her conversion and holy life created great opposition. On the advice of a priest, she stole away one night and began a 200-mile walking journey to a Christian Indian village at Sault St. Louis, near Montreal.

For three years she grew in holiness under the direction of a priest and an older Iroquois woman, giving herself totally to God in long hours of prayer, in charity and in strenuous penance. At 23 she took a vow of virginity, an unprecedented act for an Indian woman, whose future depended on being married. She found a place in the woods where she could pray an hour a day—and was accused of meeting a man there!

Her dedication to virginity was instinctive: She did not know about religious life for women until she visited Montreal. Inspired by this, she and two friends wanted to start a community, but the local priest dissuaded her. She humbly accepted an “ordinary” life. She practiced extremely severe fasting as penance for the conversion of her nation. She died the afternoon before Holy Thursday. Witnesses said that her emaciated face changed color and became like that of a healthy child. The lines of suffering, even the pockmarks, disappeared and the touch of a smile came upon her lips. She was beatified in 1980 and canonized in 2012..

Filed under American Saints St. Kateri Tekakwitha catholic history